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Session MK2 (HQ Kites)

 

The 'old Session' emerges from the operating table


Session MK2 (HQ Kites)

 

Specifications  

Model
Make
Dimensions
Frame
Sail
Bridle
Wind range
Rec. lines
Price

Session MK2
HQ Kites
180 x 76 cm
6mm carbon
Ventex, 12 panels
Turbo, sleeved Dyneema
5 - 25 mph
100 - 150 lbs, 75-125'
Around 60

Little by little HQ Is updating Its range. With the Millennium having replaced the Jam Session, now Its the Session's turn on the operating table. Christophe Fokken, who has gone be& to the fold at HQ, has designed the third version of the great classic resulting In the Session MK2.

The Session was originally aimed at clients who were moving onto their second kite or beginners who were looking for a kite that would enable them to progress quickly and well. The Session was appreciated for the fact that it did not start pulling beyond 15 to 20 mph and because it had a large wind range (5 to 25 mph).

The MK2 follows the same principles, but adds a touch of freestyle to its programme, mainly due to its turbo bridle.

In effect when the Session came out in 1993 freestyle was only just making its first tentative steps and its aptitudes for the new wave of flying only became evident further down the fine.

DESIGN/CONSTRUCTION
The leading edges are curved, the lower spreaders are low, nearer the bottom. The trailing edge, equipped with leech line, sits low and as such generates a significant sail surface area in relation to the wingspan. Depth is significant around the inner stand-off (in carbon). The other stand-off, which is more flexible, is in fibreglass. It is positioned near the leading edge, thus further increasing the effect of the depth.

The sail is made up of twelve Ventex panels enabling numerous colour combinations. Hems are glued and sewn in three-point zigzag. Construction quality and finishing are good. It has numerous reinforcements at vulnerable points, with the leading edge in Dacron so that beginners can make it work hard with peace of mind.

FLIGHT TEST
As soon as it's taken in hand, immense fluidity is noticeable in its flight with frank and precise response to commands giving it a lively air. All reactions to commands are clear, that's to say that if you want to carry out some manoeuvres it needs basic, simple gestures and not a variation on these gestures as is often the case today with freestylers.

The MK2 is not very fast in flight, but above all it is its capacity not to accelerate while passing through the middle of the window that makes it interesting for the beginner.

Its trajectories are stable with just slight oversteer. It does not build up a lot of traction. In 15 mph of wind line of 100 lbs is largely sufficient, with 150 lbs only becoming more suitable from 25 mph of wind. The MK2 stops well offering certain stability in stalls. Likewise different landings are easy and achievable and ground work with the 180 cm wingspan makes it very playful. Stable on its wing tip, a coin toss and axel take-off can be linked with ease.

Axels are performed easily enough, not too flat nor too much towards the rear and it turns well around the wing.

From 15 mph of wind and up you must move a little towards the kite, or think about really pushing with the hand that gives if you don't want it to get hung up on the wing tip. Should this happen, you need to act very quickly to untangle it, if not it will be fairly precarious to get out of the problem, even when it's landed. It's a shame that the MK2 is not fitted with a trick line - we recommend that you add one.

Another solution would be to set the kite lower by increasing the length of the upper bridle.

Its freestyle programme is huge. It is easy to find the timing of a cascade whereas for the flat spin and the 540 you need to move obviously towards the kite, especially above 15 mph of wind, or alter the setting a little lower. The MK2 is stable in a turtle, only linking fades and pancakes is a little bit sensitive, notably due to the speed of the axel. You need to find the right moment to put it into a fade.

CONCLUSION

With a complete programme of moves, achievable flight control, a good wind range and clean behaviour, the Session MK2 has everything to become a kite of reference, just like the original Session followed by the Jam Session.

You can feel the 'Christophe Fokken and the HQ Touch', which contributed to the great success of the earlier models. Its mid-season appearance has not yet allowed it to reach the public and achieve the success that it deserves, but for sure it will be partly carried forward to the next season, unless a few freestylers get hold of it to discover the extent of its programme. 

Good Points Bad Points
Clean behaviour
Extent of its programme
No trick line
Could be supplied as a package (lines and straps) for beginners
Verdict  
Accessibility
Reliability
Design
Quality/Price ratio
Performance
Packaging
5/5
4/5
5/5
5/5
5/5
4/5

Review from Kite Passion
Oct/Nov 99

 

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kite fest photos
design and plans

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how to buggy

first lesson

buggy tricks guide
buggy pics
tandem buggying
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